Signs of Spring

What we all need after a long winter of discontent

I’ve been more than tempted to malign Spring’s slow arrival this year. I’ve succumbed. I guess a 7-month-long winter will do that to a person who likes to garden, if not simply be outside without wearing several layers and spikes on my shoes. The long winter of my discontent (political and climate) had turned my thoughts more foul than the weather. Even with hints of change, I wasn’t willing to stop complaining.

Still, my determination is a formidable foe. Nearly every day for the past three weeks I’ve managed to spend a few hours in the garden, raking leaves from under shrubs, cutting back dried blooms, moving perennials, and making discoveries along the way.

Bleeding Heart.jpg  Hosta.jpg

Lady's Mantle.jpg   Peony.jpg

Bergena.jpg  Clematis.jpg

Meadow Rue.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Today when Mike the Mailman pulled up and got out of his truck, we greeted each other and commented on the lovely day. “You know,” he said, “I kind of like that Spring has been gradual this year.”

I had to agree. It was pleasant being on my hands and knees without sweat dripping in my eyes. It was nice to transplant perennials before the heat stressed them. It was comfortable working in long sleeves and not seeing (or feeling) a single bug.

A friend who isn’t from here helped me with some of the digging. The temperature hovered around 50 with a slight cloud cover and no rain. In other words, perfect for the tasks at hand. After a full day of gardening he said, “Minnesotans like to complain about the weather.”

I’m going to try not to be one of them.

NOTE: The first person within a 20-mile radius to identify all the plants shown above will win a FREE elephant ear (not the pastry). They get BIG and are great in large pots or planted directly in a sunny spot in your garden.

Elephant ear.jpg

 

2 thoughts on “Signs of Spring”

  1. I know a few of those plants. Nice way to help move beyond the malaise of winter. I was planting onion sets today. Filled 3 raised beds. Optimistically took the snow blower off my tractor! Over 1/2 way to getting electric line to greenhouse/chicken coop buried. I decided to do it by hand rather than renting a trencher. It has been a gratifying experience. Averaging 15’/hr. Another 4 hours to completion!

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  2. Lenore I have a few ideas in order of appearance: Bleeding Heart, Hosta, Anemone or geranium, rhubarb, lettuce, clematis, blood root. I love the fact you know your mailman! And good for you to get out there early and see those signs of spring we have been craving.

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